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  • Category = African Americana
  • 1920 Raymond Garfield Dandridge SIGNED & Inscribed HARLEM RENAISSANCE Black Power Poet JAZZ POETRY "The Poet And Other Poems" AFRICAN AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT Fighting RACISM Jim Crow LYNCHINGS by Raymond Garfield Dandridge 1920 Raymond Garfield Dandridge SIGNED & Inscribed HARLEM RENAISSANCE Black Power Poet JAZZ POETRY "The Poet And Other Poems" AFRICAN AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT Fighting RACISM Jim Crow LYNCHINGS
    Raymond Garfield Dandridge

    Black Harlem Renaissance Poet Raymond Garfield Dandridge (1883-1930) is beginning to get the attention he richly deserves. His poetry fits between his predecessor Paul Laurence Dunbar (whom he was often compared) and his successor Langston Hughes, beacon of the Harlem Renaissance. Dandridge was writing at the same time as Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Claude McKay but he would never see Harlem because he was paralyzed. Dandridge has a strong sense of Black Pride that is vividly expressed within this extremely scarce signed volume. He does not shy away from radical social issues. Through his poetry he promotes equality, condemns racism and injustice, and celebrates African American culture, humor, and spirituality.

    THE POET AND OTHER POEMS By Raymond Garfield…

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    Black Harlem Renaissance Poet Raymond Garfield Dandridge (1883-1930) is beginning to get the attention he richly deserves. His poetry fits between his predecessor Paul Laurence Dunbar (whom he was often compared) and his successor Langston Hughes, beacon of the Harlem Renaissance. Dandridge was writing at the same time as Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Claude McKay but he would never see Harlem because he was paralyzed. Dandridge has a strong sense of Black Pride that is vividly expressed within this extremely scarce signed volume. He does not shy away from radical social issues. Through his poetry he promotes equality, condemns racism and injustice, and celebrates African American culture, humor, and spirituality.

    THE POET AND OTHER POEMS By Raymond Garfield Dandridge.

    Privately Printed, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1920, first edition. SIGNED and INSCRIBED by African American Poet RAYMOND GARFIELD DANDRIDGE on the front free end-paper, in black pen: "In grateful appreciation to / Mr Emerson Venable / Ray G Dandridge / July 12, 1920."

    Hardcover, illustrated paper covered boards, 7.5" x 5", marbled end-papers, 64 pages. VERY GOOD CONDITION: Complete as issued. The covers have light edge and spine-end wear; light age-toning; a touch of wear to the boards and a small stain. Internally, just some stiff upper corner creasing to the last text leaf, otherwise the inner pages are tight, bright, clean and unmarked, and the 1920 signature/inscription is bold and bright. Books signed by Dandridge are extremely hard to find and historically important. He died when he was only 47 years old.

    The Harlem Renaissance was a phase of a larger New Negro Movement that emerged in the early 20th century and helped usher in the civil rights movement of the late 1940s and early 1950s.

    In 1911, Dandridge caught polio (or had a stroke) leaving his legs and right arm paralyzed. He spent his entire writing career confined to bed. He worked as a salesman for a coal company via telephone, and was the Literary Editor of the Cincinnati Journal. He published three books of poetry: Penciled Poems (1917), The Poet and Other Poems (1920), and Zalka Peetruza and Other Poems (1928). His work appears in anthologies of African American poetry, including The Book of American Negro Poetry.

    Inscribed to Emerson Venable (1875-1965) noted Shakespearean authority, English Literature Professor, editor of Poets of Ohio (1909), and father of Hollywood actress Evelyn Venable.

    A few examples of his powerful poetry collected in this volume:

    "My Grievance," addresses racism in general and lynching in particular: "Yes, I am lynched. Is it that I Must without judge or jury die? Though innocent, am I accursed To quench the mob's blood-thirsty thirst?"

    "Time to Die," is a call to action: "Black Brother, think you life so sweet That you would live at any price? Does mere existence balance with The weight of your great sacrifice?"

    "Color Blind," champions equality and tolerance: "True I am black not by my will; I had no choice of hue, And none was given you. By His decree our roles we fill.

    Red man, Yellow man, Brown man, You too, man of white, What cause or right Have we to emphasize our clan?"

    "Brother Mine," exposes Jim Crow oppression: "Prejudice with venom smote every word and act; Snuffed was the light of knowledge from your view. Unbefriended martyr, sole object of attack, Has your fair brother fairly dealt with you, Brother mine?"

    This collection is also recognized for having the earliest published example of "Jazz Poetry" by a Black Poet "De Drum Majah". His evocative use of dialect, though controversial, reveals African American life while protesting racial inequality.

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  • CECIL BROWN, Black Author and Screenwriter, TYPESCRIPT DRAFT of "DAYS WITHOUT WEATHER" + a FIRST EDITION SIGNED & INSCRIBED by CECIL BROWN CECIL BROWN, Black Author and Screenwriter, TYPESCRIPT DRAFT of "DAYS WITHOUT WEATHER" + a FIRST EDITION SIGNED & INSCRIBED
    CECIL BROWN

    Typescript Draft of the novel DAYS WITHOUT WEATHER by CECIL BROWN, an African-American author and screenwriter.

    Copy of an original draft typescript. This early photocopy of the original typed pages was probably made for distribution to agent, editor and/or publisher.

    The last page is Signed and Dated: "July 3, 1981 / Hollywood-Berkeley 1979, 81 / Cecil Brown" (again, this is a draft COPY of the actual signed page, not a hand signature on this draft) . The author's typed name "Brown": is at the top of every page. 296 pages, printed on plain 8.5x11 inch paper, printed on one side only (i.e. there are 296 sheets of paper).

    Accompanying this typescript draft is a HAND SIGNED and INSCRIBED First…

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    Typescript Draft of the novel DAYS WITHOUT WEATHER by CECIL BROWN, an African-American author and screenwriter.

    Copy of an original draft typescript. This early photocopy of the original typed pages was probably made for distribution to agent, editor and/or publisher.

    The last page is Signed and Dated: "July 3, 1981 / Hollywood-Berkeley 1979, 81 / Cecil Brown" (again, this is a draft COPY of the actual signed page, not a hand signature on this draft) . The author's typed name "Brown": is at the top of every page. 296 pages, printed on plain 8.5x11 inch paper, printed on one side only (i.e. there are 296 sheets of paper).

    Accompanying this typescript draft is a HAND SIGNED and INSCRIBED First Edition of DAYS WITHOUT WEATHER. Hardcover book in dustjacket, 5.5x8 inches, 250 pages. Published by Farrar Straus Giroux, 1983. "First Edition 1983" stated on the copyright page. The inscription is on the front free endpaper: "To Stanley / Here's to the new friendship! / Cecil Brown / Sept. 6 1987".

    The TYPESCRIPT is in GOOD condition: the pages are lightly age toned; the first page has some closed edge tears, corner creases, and edge wear; the first 25 pages have corner creases; the last 10 pages have corner creases; the last several pages have edge wear, closed edge tears, and creases; the last page has a lot of creasing and edge tears; there are early photocopy machine smudges, marks, and lines here and there throughout. Overall, ALL PAGES, including the first and last page, remain bright and clear. The BOOK is in NEAR FINE condition, tight, bright, clean and clear; the DUSTJACKET is in GOOD condition, substantially sunned / faded at the spine, otherwise solid and bright. A nice, signed, first edition copy.

    SCARCE WORKING DRAFT of the BITTER & FUNNY NOVEL "DAYS WITHOUT WEATHER" by the BLACK NOVELIST and SCREENWRITER CECIL BROWN, along with a first edition, signed and inscribed copy of the published book.

    About CECIL BROWN (from Wikipedia):

    ******Cecil Brown, b.1943, is an African-American author, screenwriter, and professor at the University of California, Berkeley. His noted works include The Life and Loves of Mr. Jiveass Nigger and work as a screenwriter on the 1977 Richard Pryor film Which Way Is Up?

    Born in rural Bolton, North Carolina, Brown attended North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University of Greensboro, North Carolina, where he earned his B.A. in English in 1966. He later earned his Ph.D. in African American Studies, Folklore and Narrative from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a Professor at U.C. Berkeley in the African American Studies Department. His published books include: The Life and Loves of Mr. Jiveass Nigger (1969); Pryor Lives (1969); Days Without Weather (1983); I, Stagolee (1993); Stagolee Shot Billy (2003); and Dude, Where's My Black Studies Department? (2007).

    Awards include: Professor John Angus Burrell Memorial Prize, Columbia University, 1966; Before Columbus Foundation American Book Award for DAYS WITHOUT WEATHER, 1984; Berlin Literary Fellowship, 1985; UC Berkeley, Mentor Fellowship, 1992.******

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  • INFORMAL ADOPTION in BLACK FAMILIES in LOWNDES and WILCOX COUNTIES, ALABAMA 1975 by Lewis W. Jones INFORMAL ADOPTION in BLACK FAMILIES in LOWNDES and WILCOX COUNTIES, ALABAMA 1975
    Lewis W. Jones

    INFORMAL ADOPTION in BLACK FAMILIES in LOWNDES and WILCOX COUNTIES, ALABAMA. By Lewis W. Jones, Director, Tuskegee Institute Center for Rural Development.

    Published by the Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, under a Grant from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 1975.

    Printed paper covers, side stapled with black cloth tape covering the spine and staples, 8.5x11 inches, 51 pages, pages printed on one side only.

    GOOD condition, a few small, light stains, a couple corner creases, overall tight, bright, clean, clear and unmarked.

    From the Introduction: "In 1972, forty-eight black children were legally adopted in Alabama. This number by no means accounts for black children who were taken into substitute families. This rearing of children in a substitute family without observance…

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    INFORMAL ADOPTION in BLACK FAMILIES in LOWNDES and WILCOX COUNTIES, ALABAMA. By Lewis W. Jones, Director, Tuskegee Institute Center for Rural Development.

    Published by the Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, under a Grant from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 1975.

    Printed paper covers, side stapled with black cloth tape covering the spine and staples, 8.5x11 inches, 51 pages, pages printed on one side only.

    GOOD condition, a few small, light stains, a couple corner creases, overall tight, bright, clean, clear and unmarked.

    From the Introduction: "In 1972, forty-eight black children were legally adopted in Alabama. This number by no means accounts for black children who were taken into substitute families. This rearing of children in a substitute family without observance of the prescribed legalities we designate "informal adoption"...It is, of course, difficult to know precisely how many children in what areas are being brought up, and by whom, under such conditions, but there can be no doubt that the number is considerable, in the tens of thousands...It is unlikely that many of the adults and children who have entered into such arrangements are aware of their legal responsibilities and rights...The problem this research considers is that of illuminating the legal, social and cultural contexts in which informal adoption of black children takes place in the rural South..."

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  • MARVIN GAYE Scarce 1974 LET'S GET IT ON Oakland Coliseum SOUVENIR CONCERT PROGRAM by Marvin Gaye MARVIN GAYE Scarce 1974 LET'S GET IT ON Oakland Coliseum SOUVENIR CONCERT PROGRAM
    Marvin Gaye

    Original "Let's Get It On" Concert Program Starring Marvin Gaye. Friday, January 4, 1974, Oakland Coliseum.

    Souvenir Program, printed by Abbey Press, Inc, Oakland, California, 1974. First and only edition, softcover, 11" x 8.5", side staple bound, 16 pages (including covers), illustrated thought with black & white and and sepia toned photographs of Marvin Gaye and other performers including Ashford and Simpson, Johnny Talbot, The Del Tones, the two M.C's Wally Cox and local television news anchor Belva Davis, Valerie Campbell after party VIP Model, and producer Melvin Reid. The text includes a biography of Marvin Gaye, an interview with Ashford and Simpson by noted Black music writer Vernon Gibbs, a Proclamation by the City of Berkeley recognizing Gaye…

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    Original "Let's Get It On" Concert Program Starring Marvin Gaye. Friday, January 4, 1974, Oakland Coliseum.

    Souvenir Program, printed by Abbey Press, Inc, Oakland, California, 1974. First and only edition, softcover, 11" x 8.5", side staple bound, 16 pages (including covers), illustrated thought with black & white and and sepia toned photographs of Marvin Gaye and other performers including Ashford and Simpson, Johnny Talbot, The Del Tones, the two M.C's Wally Cox and local television news anchor Belva Davis, Valerie Campbell after party VIP Model, and producer Melvin Reid. The text includes a biography of Marvin Gaye, an interview with Ashford and Simpson by noted Black music writer Vernon Gibbs, a Proclamation by the City of Berkeley recognizing Gaye as a "Gentleman of the Arts," and a Proclamation from the City of Oakland designating January 4, 1974 as "Marvin Gaye Day." GOOD CONDITION: Complete as issued, the program has some light creases and bends from handling and use, the staples have a little rust but are holding well, the front cover has some areas of light abrasion and red pen upper margin notations, otherwise very bright and clean and without any tears or fading, it appears to have been stored away since the concert. I have yet to see another example. A scarce and highly collectable piece of Motown and Oakland memorabilia.

    After over four years without touring and the success of his 1971 album What's Going On and his best selling record ever 1973's Let's Get It On, Marvin Gaye's fans and Motown were clamoring for a big concert tour. Rumor had it Marvin promised an Oakland concert to Wally Cox, his friend, soul singer, producer and Oakland native. But as the concert date got closer, Marvin balked. Cox and his partner, Mel Reid (owner of Reid's Records in Berkeley, one of the first Black owned record shops in California) who was a fixture in the local gospel music community, had already advertised the show. They told Marvin that he owed it to the Black community to do the Oakland concert and he did. The January 4, 1974 Oakland Coliseum performance was a major success and the live album he recorded of this concert, Marvin Gaye Live! went Top 10.

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  • Scarce 1982 Catalogue of African American Women & Men Independent Filmmakers BLACK ON BLACK The New Black Cinema Movement NOT Blaxploitation by Richard Gaugert, Clyde Taylor, Oliver Franklin Scarce 1982 Catalogue of African American Women & Men Independent Filmmakers BLACK ON BLACK The New Black Cinema Movement NOT Blaxploitation
    Richard Gaugert, Clyde Taylor, Oliver Franklin

    BLACK ON BLACK. Films by African American Filmmakers. Exhibition Catalogue from an extraordinary 1982 St. Louis Museum film exhibition commemorating the achievement of Black independent filmmakers. Featuring the following films and filmmakers: KUUMBA: SIMON'S NEW SOUND, 1978, Carol Munday Lawrence; CLARENCE AND ANGEL, 1980, Robert Gardner; GODS IN EXILE, 1975-76, Alfred Santana; A PLACE IN TIME, 1976, Charles Lane; JUST BRIEFLY, 1976, Louise Fleming; TRANSMAGNIFICAN DAMBAMUALITY, 1976, Ronald K. Gray; MOJA: THE LAST AMERICAN, 1977, Ed Henderson; FOUR WOMEN, 1977, Julie Dash; KILLER OF SHEEP, 1977, Charles Burnett; PASS/FAIL, 1978, Roy Campanella, Jr.; CHARLES WHITE: DRAWINGS FROM LIFE, 1979, Carlton Moss; HOMECOMIN', 1980, Sati Jamal & Reginald Brown; SYVILLA: THEY DANCE TO HER DRUM, 1979, Ayoka Chenzira; RADIO, 1980, Carl…

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    BLACK ON BLACK. Films by African American Filmmakers. Exhibition Catalogue from an extraordinary 1982 St. Louis Museum film exhibition commemorating the achievement of Black independent filmmakers. Featuring the following films and filmmakers: KUUMBA: SIMON'S NEW SOUND, 1978, Carol Munday Lawrence; CLARENCE AND ANGEL, 1980, Robert Gardner; GODS IN EXILE, 1975-76, Alfred Santana; A PLACE IN TIME, 1976, Charles Lane; JUST BRIEFLY, 1976, Louise Fleming; TRANSMAGNIFICAN DAMBAMUALITY, 1976, Ronald K. Gray; MOJA: THE LAST AMERICAN, 1977, Ed Henderson; FOUR WOMEN, 1977, Julie Dash; KILLER OF SHEEP, 1977, Charles Burnett; PASS/FAIL, 1978, Roy Campanella, Jr.; CHARLES WHITE: DRAWINGS FROM LIFE, 1979, Carlton Moss; HOMECOMIN', 1980, Sati Jamal & Reginald Brown; SYVILLA: THEY DANCE TO HER DRUM, 1979, Ayoka Chenzira; RADIO, 1980, Carl Clay; A DIFFERENT IMAGE, 1982, Alile Sharon Larkin; TRYPTICH, 1978, William C. West; THE CEREMONY, 1980, Hugh Thompson; FLESH, METAL, WOOD, 1981, Floyd Webb; FOR COLORED MEN WHO'VE HAD ENUF!, 1981, Ileen Sands; THE CALLING, 1981, Charles Fox III; GEORGE'S DEBUT, 1980, John Perry III, INVISIBLE, 1982, Bob Clark. Each artist has a brief biography, most have photographic portraits, and a film still.

    Many of the filmmakers in this exhibition catalogue are Black Women.

    With a prologue by Richard Gaugert, African American Film Curator for the St. Louis Museum, and interviews with selected filmmakers by Oliver Franklin, pioneering independent Black film producer who founded the Black American Film Festivals in Philadelphia.

    Acclaimed African American Film Scholar Clyde Taylor writes in the catalogue's historic essay on Black Cinema, "The films showcased by the Black On Black series are part of a new Black cinema, a vital art movement whose popular recognition may lie just over the horizon .... Still, the paradox remains. A fuller, more balanced, responsible portrayal of Black people is found in this new cinema than in Hollywood's total output, including the Black exploitation films of the 1970's. Yet the new Black cinema goes barely noticed by those searching for "positive Black images". Why? The perspective of history is needed to understand this contradiction and to grasp the significance of this Black renaissance in films."

    Of note: Clyde Taylor coined the term L.A. Rebellion, a movement inspired by UCLA graduate student Charles Burnett's film "Killer of Sheep" (found in this catalogue) where young Black filmmakers concerned with the portrayal of African Americans on screen, saw film as a means for social change.

    Published by the Saint Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, Missouri, 1982. First edition, first printing, Softcover, embossed black card covers, 11" x 8.5", side staple bound, glassine front and rear endpapers, 37 (3) pages, illustrated with 29 black & white portraits and film stills. GOOD CONDITION: covers are lightly creased around staples, and have some light wear, there is waviness and light shorelining to the upper front edge of the covers and the inner pages probably from long ago contact with water, there is an Oakland Museum Library stamp on the glassine front free endpaper, otherwise tight, bright, clean and unmarked. A solid, respectable copy of this scarce exhibition catalogue.

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